The evolution of B2B content and the era of short-formism

Embracing the shift to shorter publishing cycles while improving customer functionality

Understand the context behind short-form content’s increasing popularity and gain insight into the workflow processes publishers are implementing to ensure a smooth short-form content creation process

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The adoption of digital publishing platforms over the last ten to 20 years has enabled publishers to expand their services due to increased capabilities, such as report bundling and through offering subscription packages. Publishers of B2B research are now at yet another stage of the digital transformation: we call it short-formism – the publication of shorter reports more frequently.

This whitepaper explores how publishers of high-value market analysis are increasingly embracing this change and what this means for research, editorial and production workflow. We also introduce a simple framework for managing a continuous feedback loop within workflow to ensure the reader is served with compelling and useful content.

Contents

The move to short-form content
The impact on workflow
The goldfish effect
Purchasing content: the subscription model
Analytics benefits from digital transformation
Four reasons to incorporate usage data into publishing workflow
Optimised data visualisation

Figures

Figure 1: From print to digital – 20 years of B2B content delivery
Figure 2: Increase in the search term “infographic”
Figure 3: A continuous feedback loop for publishers’ workflow

How publishers can efficiently run multiple brands from a single platform

A publisher running several digital brands on a number of different systems risks workflow inefficiencies and higher production costs

Simplify client management

Running multiple digital publishing brands through a single content and client management platform simplifies and speeds up administrative tasks, freeing up time and valuable resources.

The pain points associated with running multiple clients across disparate systems is removed as the same managerial tools are applied to all clients. Publishers are empowered to manage each client equally well and run operations with greater efficiency and oversight.

Offer service consistency

A platform delivering the same content formats and workflow tools across multiple digital brands enables the publisher to offer a common standard to all its customers. Useful functionality, familiar products, valuable tools and high service levels across all brands helps bring service consistency to a publisher’s portfolio.

“Making it easier for clients to understand our entire Power & Renewables content portfolio – and to find and access content for themselves – contributed to growing ‘per user’ engagement levels”.

Matt DaPrato

Product Suite Director, Wood Mackenzie

Create sales opportunities

Using a single platform to power multiple publishing brands enables a publisher to make new content available to subscribers. Through search results and appropriate marketing, a client of Brand A can be made aware of relevant content available via Brand B. Enabling subscribers to access relevant content outside their licence can help generate additional revenues, improve subscriber satisfaction and helps build engagement across a portfolio.

For example, energy market analysts Wood Mackenzie used Publish Interactive to pull together a number of research offerings. Matthew DaPrato, a Product Suite Director at Wood Mackenzie points out: “Making it easier for clients to understand our entire Power & Renewables content portfolio – and to find and access content for themselves – contributed to growing ‘per user’ engagement levels”.

See how the Publish Interactive platform can help your publishing company run multiple brands from a single platform, book a product tour to be guided by an expert.

Read the customer story: How WoodMac used Publish Interactive to merge three digital experiences into a single platform

How an investor relations magazine boosted engagement and simplified renewals

With Publish Interactive, IR Magazine is now able to make its back catalogue available to subscribers, track content use and publish new benchmarking and insight content as interactive reports.

IR Media Group is a specialist information business serving investor relations professionals. It provides news, events and research for stock listed businesses globally through its IR Magazine brand.

Insight from IR Magazine is vital for its subscribers, yet prior to its adoption of Publish Interactive’s smart content management and publishing system, it had limited ways of actively engaging with users nor the ability to analyse how its research content was used.

New reports were created then distributed as PDFs, but this meant there were limited opportunities to analyse usage and customer engagement.

IR Magazine recognised the opportunity to add real value to its offering by helping clients make better use of its research and applying content tracking to understand usage and feed that back into creation, sales and marketing.

Understanding usage

With Publish Interactive, IR Magazine is now able to make its back catalogue available to subscribers, track content use and publish new benchmarking and insight content as interactive reports.

“We had been looking at ways to improve the service we offer subscribers. Our old system didn’t provide analytics, now we can see who is accessing our research reports,” says Stuart O’Hara, Head of Content Marketing, IR Magazine.

“We’ll publish around 15 new reports this year. With Publish Interactive, we can track, analyse usage, feedback to the editorial team and target products to the right people.

“If someone isn’t maximising their annual subscription, they’re not left in the cold for a year. We can help them use us more intuitively and, in doing so, make the renewal process easier.

“We can also upsell more easily now and the fact that we now have a great user experience provides the sales team with a USP to win new customers.”

Enhancing user experiences

Critical in IR Magazine’s bid to improve its offering was a need to boost engagement and enhance the user experience. Publish Interactive helped by providing intuitive workflow tools, high quality search and interactivity that allows users clip content, export to multiple formats and create bespoke reports.

“With Publish Interactive, we’re far more engaging. Content is in a single destination, search and navigation are simple and we have added features like ‘Ask the Editor’, where users can fire questions at us. That functionality wasn’t possible when our output was just in PDF, ” adds Stuart.

 

Deepening engagement

Since establishing its new content portal, IR Magazine has developed plans to extend use of the platform to attract new business.

“The response from customers has been positive. They find the Publish Interactive-powered elements of our website easy to use and engaging, the next step is to deepen engagement further,” says Stuart.

That process will involve the introduction of user guides and deepening internal understanding of analytics to ensure content is created that meets users’ needs and to more closely track subscriber behaviour and respond accordingly.

“We want to use this new portal to help us gain as many new customers as possible and encourage our existing subscribers to make full use of the content available for them to access,” Stuart adds.

Tags

  • Analytics
  • Content Management
  • Subscription Renewals

Choosing the right research publishing platform: A practical guide to selecting the best content platform

A practical guide to selecting the best content platform

Introducing the FAVER methodology

Have you ever wondered how the most successful companies ensure they choose the right supplier for their business?

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Choosing a new software provider is a challenge for any organisation. There are multiple considerations to make around business objectives, functionality, security and cost.

Picking the right solution for your company is a complex process and will involve much consideration and many team members. At Content Catalyst we have helped hundreds of publishing professionals solve this challenge. We have been supplying software to market analyst firms and research publishers for over 16 years. Without being too boastful – we like to think of ourselves as experts!

We have complied our knowledge and expertise in publishing systems (at last count we had over 100 years’ experience!) and put together an essential 22-page guide to help publishers make wise choices. We have even designed a lightweight methodology called FAVER to help you lay the groundwork needed to switch to a new software supplier.

The guide is packed with useful advice from those on the sharp end of system deployment. By downloading and reading this guide you will be able:

  • Better manage your supplier identification project,
  • Specify the business objectives driving new system adoption
  • Ensure you have considered how to manage your customers’ experience,
  • Understand the resource needed to transition to a new system; and,
  • Use our handy checklist to track progress of your decision-making process.

By reading the guide we guarantee you will be much better prepared to tackle the process of finding a supplier and will be able to confidently reach a purchasing decision.

Contents

Overview
Who this guide is for
How to use this guide

Stage I: Needs & Planning
Why switch?
Success expectations
Team and stakeholders
Your customers’ experience
Workflow practices
Stage I: Recap

Stage II: System Specifications
Essential functionality
Your content
Search
Branding and white labelling
Access to information
Analytics
Integrations and APIs
Technical and security requirements
Stage II: Recap

Stage III: Supplier Selection
Maximising a demonstration
Cultural fit & experience
Time and resource
Training
Price and ongoing costs
Negotiating the contract
Contract length
Cancellation
Payment terms
Contract terms
Launch plan Stage III: Recap

Checklist
FAVER methodology checklist

About Content Catalyst Ltd

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How business information publishers should plan for business post-Coronavirus

We explore six areas that management should focus on to ensure continuity and growth during the Covid era

Government responses to the Coronavirus pandemic are having a terrible impact on economic activity. Fortunately, unlike travel or hospitality, the B2B publishing sector is not in the immediate front line of the fallouts from government lockdowns. That said, as the economy rapidly weakens and confidence falls, there will be a longer-term impact on the sector and revenues will be bitten into.

Apart from live events, which are currently either cancelled or postponed to a future ‘normal’, not all is doom and gloom for publishers of high-value B2B information and data products. Aggregated visitor data to our publisher customers content platforms is showing no significant change in numbers since the crisis began.  Perhaps we can conclude from this data that our publishers’ content and data (which covers many industries) is still valuable and needed by their corporate customers.

Further encouraging signals came from a recent survey by B2B media subscription consultancy Substribe, which indicated that over 80% of B2B publishers have seen an increase in customer engagement since mid-March. However, despite this robust percentage, only 40% are confident about growth from their subscriptions. Perhaps the survey question was incorrectly phrased – who apart from grocery stores and video conference tech providers are expecting growth?

So, what should B2B publishers and business information providers be doing to ensure they survive this economic crisis and come out the other side fitter and ready to take advantage of opportunities? I suggest six actions that all publishers should be considering right now.

1.  Intensify focus on retaining your customers.

The old adage for choosing property (and name of a popular English television house hunting programme), location, location, location could be matched in the publishing world by retention, retention, retention. The winners will be companies that retain their customers through this crisis.  Until now, churn is a way of life for subscription businesses. Acquiring new customers is going to be harder and unlikely to replace lost revenue. Think about it this way – zero churn is great for the bottom line because you are not having to replace lost revenue to stand still.

Holding onto a customer who is paying half of what they were pre-crisis is better than loosing them completely. So be nice, be smart and be proactive.

2.  Understand the value of your content

As a first-year marketing student will tell you, value is not the same as price. In the intangible world of content and data the value of product is often very much in the eye of the beholder. Your data might be robust and your analysts’ opinion well regarded but understanding why your customers buy your product and what tasks they use it for is not easy. Start off by asking straight up why your customer values the content. Additionally, use analytics to see which content is being used. Be careful with popular content versus valuable content. Some subjects are popular (like articles on Tesla’s Elon Musk’s latest indiscretions!) but not necessarily useful in your customers’ tasks. In this crisis companies are looking for support to help with forecasting, understanding how competitors are responding and looking for competitive advantage to survive. It is important to convey that you are the trusted guide through this crisis in your messaging.

The old adage for choosing property (and name of a popular English television house hunting programme), location, location, location could be matched in the publishing world by retention, retention, retention. The winners will be companies that retain their customers through this crisis.

3.  Invest in delivery platforms

The sudden move to homeworking has made access to paid content and data through the user’s browser an imperative. Companies still relying on terminals or IP-specific access will have to change. We live in an access-anywhere at anytime world and self-service content delivery platforms are a must.

In many cases your customers are performing tasks with your content and data. Will the “Zoom factor” change the way B2B information is packaged?  Ask how you can help with their tasks and workflow  and where they take place. This may open internal conversations about how the actual delivery of content could be improved.

4.   Diversify your portfolio

Although virtually no sector is going to be left unscathed by the economic fallout from Coronavirus containment measures, some sectors are more badly affected than others.  , while others such as transport or construction could suffer as companies in those sectors lose confidence and shed staff. Some information formats are suffering such as live events which are decimated, and advertising-driven publications are seeing sharp downturns. But, other forms such as news, market forecasts (however sketchy!) and peer advice are seeing upticks in engagement and readership.

This begs the following questions for a publishing company’s management. Should they:

  • Specialise heavily in one sector or publish across industry verticals?
  • Offer a range of formats with different type of revenue streams? and,
  • Look to repackage their content for a different audience?

However, whatever the sector or format, I believe the companies that will prosper are those that have a range of offers, solid subscription revenues and, above all, are trusted and valued by their customers.

5.  Accelerate product innovation

Anecdotally the crisis is accelerating the pace of innovation and change in companies. Decision making is quicker and projects that were scheduled to take months are now being completed in weeks. Whether this ‘war footing’ can continue indefinitely remains to be seen, but creativity will become increasingly essential in finding ways to adapt. Companies with high exposure in the live events sector or from advertising revenue will want to quickly rethink the future of their offer. Some ideas I have heard floated could include:

  • Develop a freemium-type model to drive readership in the hope that a profitable percentage can be converted into customers when the economy recovers. For example, a regular, (sector specific) update summarising Coronavirus related news
  • Repurpose old IP (after all its creation is a sunk cost) into a new product. This idea has relevance for conference companies who might have stacks of old presentations.
  • There is a real sense that people are ‘lonely’ in business and want to be connected to those having similar experiences. Can this desire for social connectivity and community within the business world be an opportunity?
  • Look how to double-down on subscription revenues. Can you communicate more value or transition to a membership model with a more personalised offer?
  • Repackage content and sell at a different price bracket of to a different audience.

6.  Prepare for a downturn and change in working patterns

Preparing for an economic downturn is gloomy but also pragmatic. Many sectors are and will experience a slump as the economy goes into recession. Instead of hoping that things will go back to normal (bit vague – what is normal?) all companies must prepare themselves for leaner times. Publishers will be exposed to the vagaries of their customers’ spend and will need to regularly reforecast, find efficiencies and reduce overheads. Additionally, in the short-to-medium term working patterns for staff will change with more homeworking and less face-to-face contact, which will change daily operations. On this point the future is unknown, but the successful companies will be those that develop new approaches rather than reacting with short-term solutions.

Looking to the future

In summary, I think the publishers and B2B info companies that will come through this crisis in good shape are those that work hard to:

  • Build personal relationships with their key customers and empathises with their needs,
  • Communicate the value of their product and reinforce why the content and data is trustworthy,
  • Deliver products that help the users complete a task (particularly important as so many are working remotely),
  • Develop a diversified product portfolio, by sector, usage and audience, and,
  • Think creatively about how to turn a crisis into an opportunity.

The cliched saying that we are living in unprecedented times is of course a truism. We are living in challenging times and are having to rapidly change the way we work. Publishers which will be most successful are those that adapt to this huge challenge facing humanity – a new challenge for everyone involved.

7 key trends for B2B research publishers in 2020

To mark the end of one decade and in anticipation of the next (is it really 20 years since the Millennium!) we have highlighted trends that are likely to shape high-value business-to-business research publishing over the next 12 months and beyond.

Our seven trends that forward-thinking research publishers should consider as we move into 2020 are…

#1 Continued emphasis on subscriptions

Publishers will continue to try and persuade low value customers to become subscribers that provide recurring revenues. There are multiple routes to this goal, including the development of membership programmes with dynamic pricing, or planning an upgrade path from first interaction to fully-fledged high-value customer.

Technology enables this process to run more smoothly by personalising the user journey and establishing a upsell mechanism that encourages single copy customers to develop a deeper relationship with the publisher.

#2 The customer at the heart of decisions

The next 12 months will see greater emphasis on customer centricity and developing this mindset across the organisation. This will mean publishers spending as much time as possible with their customers to really understand the value they provide.

Customer centricity isn’t just about cementing external relationships: product teams will be working alongside customer-facing teams to ensure products are on point. We anticipate that those in customer-facing roles, such as sales, should become more involved in product design and development.

#3 Embedding interactive data

We expect publishers to really start tackling the technical challenge of how to allow users secure and seamless access to different content types. Specifically, we are thinking about how interactive data can be made securely available alongside written analysis – or embedded within.

By making use of single sign-on systems and/or technical integrations, users can be provided with access to the specific content they need even more quickly and easily.

#4 Making use of accessible AI

In 2020 artificial intelligence and the computing power needed to run advanced algorithms will become more accessible than ever before.

Publishers will have the potential to develop search that understands what is contained in a piece of content and the nature of its relationship to other content types. Deepening the quality of search can help users cut through content noise to specific information that answers their questions.

#5 Shortening time-to-publish workflows

Customers of syndicated market research will increasingly demand more timely data and insight. This puts pressure on publishers to reduce the time spent developing, producing and publishing content. A digital-first workflow – enter-once-distribute-anywhere – will be the goal.

In 2020, publishers will start to look harder for efficiencies in the authoring and production process. This could take the form of automated content reviews, in-platform authoring or on-the-fly design.

#6 Differentiation through content design

We anticipate high-value publishers will place greater emphasis on content design as a branding mechanism. This should help create a sense of authority, value and quality that will set them apart from less compelling sources that are either free or low cost.

We expect content to be more specifically designed for screen consumption, rather than print. As such, data and storytelling content is likely to become more visual with fewer words.

#7 Analytics at the heart of everything

Readership and content usage stats will be increasingly used by publishers to manage their business. Customer usage data will underpin subscription renewal discussions as perceived use of content will be challenged by data on actual use.

Taking cues from the B2C world, editors will use data on topic or article popularity to help with content commissioning.

Life science advisory firm launches new brand to publish in rich formats for multiple brands

ScienceandMedicine

With Publish Interactive powering its new delivery platform, Science and Medicine Group is able to serve multiple audiences through a single site.

SMG

Science and Medicine Group is a leading research and advisory firm serving the life science, analytical instrument, diagnostic, healthcare, radiology, and dental industries. It provides research and business information through text-based sector reports and visually-rich slide decks.

After a string of acquisitions – and as part of a rebrand – Science and Medicine Group needed to create a single repository to aid the creation, distribution, and cross-sell of its research content.

Clients across its distinct brands have varied requirements around the type of content they receive. As such, Science and Medicine Group needed an online tool that could serve content in multiple formats, but with a consistent user experience.

The business also needed a solution that would allow it to offer a subscription service to its market report portfolio to simplify the purchase process for its clients.

“Having a start-of-the-art publishing distribution system in place will allow our clients to secure access to our business intelligence for their entire team or company. This will greatly streamline the effort required to identify and purchase market reports covering all of the topics of interest to their organization,” said Justin Dudash, Head of Marketing, Science and Medicine Group.

A single destination

With Publish Interactive powering its new delivery platform, Science and Medicine Group is able to serve multiple audiences through a single site.

“We now operate eight distinct brands, with five of them publishing brands. Bioinformatics, Instrument Business Outlook, IMV Research, Kalorama Information, and Strategic Directions International.each have strong brand recognition and reputation in their respective industries” added Dudash.

To maintain the independence of each brand, individual reports are categorized according to their specific publisher. In addition, Science and Medicine Group created a landing page for each brand within the platform, promoting the catalogue of market reports available and to encourage cross-selling opportunities for its clients.

The landing pages act as a key destination for highlighting content to users, while industry-specific categories enable Science and Medicine Group to make it easier for users to find and access content relevant to their interests.

Multiple formats

Different user expectations across its multiple brands means Science and Medicine Group is required to publish content in varied formats to suit these audiences.

“Our Kalorama Information brand creates and publishes content in Word, whereas our other brands create and publish documents of up to 1,000 pages in PowerPoint to allow their audiences to easily absorb charts and table-rich content. Publish Interactive’s technology elegantly handles both publishing methods which enables us to offer content in the formats our distinct audiences prefer. It also provides an excellent user experience where content is easily searchable, accessible, and reusable across all formats and content types.”

Subscriptions

The adoption of a single destination also allows Science and Medicine Group to highlight the depth and breadth of all its brands to customers for the first time.

While searching for content, users will be shown all related material – both in and outside of their licensed access. This will allow users to consider content beyond their current subscription and make ad-hoc purchases of additional material when needed to support their strategic planning.

In addition to selling brand-specific subscriptions, Science and Medicine Group can now also offer industry-specific subscriptions that span multiple publishers.

“Implementing Publish Interactive is helping us to democratize information within our client companies, such that the thousands of users on our platform have direct access to the business intelligence they need, when they need it.”

Tags

  • Branding
  • Content Management
  • Digital Transformation

How an energy industry consultancy merged three research products into a single platform

Thanks to a partnership with Publish Interactive, WoodMac has been able to equip its Power & Renewables division to serve customers more efficiently and with a higher degree of user satisfaction.

Wood Mackenzie (WoodMac) is a highly-regarded global research firm for the energy, chemical, and extractive industries. It provides data and insights to inform business decisions, with new content published daily across the group.

Demand for market intelligence from WoodMac has led to the acquisition of two related industry-knowledge businesses in the Power & Renewables sector – but this left the business managing customers across three separate content platforms with varied user experiences, structures and functionality across the sites.

‘Having three platforms was a problem…’

Thanks to a partnership with Publish Interactive, WoodMac has been able to equip its Power & Renewables division to serve customers more efficiently and with a higher degree of user satisfaction.

“WoodMac has grown by acquisition, since 2016, we have taken on Greentech Media and MAKE to bolster our Power & Renewables offering, but this left us with three separate self-service platforms,” said Matthew DaPrato, Product Suite Director, Power & Renewables, WoodMac.

“Having three platforms to run was a problem. Similar products across the sites had different names, each platform had a unique structure, and functionality was varied across the sites, there was no consistency.”

WoodMac used Publish Interactive’s publishing and monetisation platform to merge the content of WoodMac, Make, and Greentech Media. Its Power & Renewables information is now published under the WoodMac brand through a single, customer-centric web portal.

“The Publish Interactive system is intuitive and it’s simple to use. Publish Interactive has elegant features; particularly its search, which has really helped our engagement, both internally and externally. We have also been able to align our structures and add consistency across our Power & Renewables content,” added Matthew.

‘Lots of customers didn’t know what content we had…’

With content spread across three platforms, WoodMac was spending a significant proportion of time dealing with queries as customers couldn’t easily find the content they needed.

“Many of our customers didn’t really understand the breadth of information we had,” said Matthew. “Now, we can organise around topics, subject categories, and even products to make it easier for customers find and access every piece of content that might be useful to them.

Making it easier for clients to understand the entire Power & Renewables content portfolio and to find and access content for themselves contributed to growing ‘per user’ engagement levels in the first three months of using Publish Interactive.” Matthew described this change as a “ very encouraging sign.”

‘It allowed us to move to market quickly…’

With 365 pieces of content published in 2018, WoodMac is used to creating and releasing new Power & Renewables materials almost every day. As such, it wanted to avoid a long implementation of publishing technology. It needed a solution that would satisfy its customers’ needs and that could be up and running in the shortest possible time.

“Implementation was critical for us,” added Matthew. “We wanted to do it quickly, we only had a tight window to bring new a platform online… considering all the technology and stakeholders we had to engage, we managed to get it done pretty efficiently.”

The speed of implementation allowed WoodMac to go to market quickly with its new unified brand and, in doing so, enabled its clients to engage with its Power & Renewables content in a new, user-friendly environment at the earliest possible opportunity.

Tags

  • Content Management
  • Digital Transformation
  • Search

The changing role of the analyst: the move away from manual reformatting

It used to be the case that research reports had to be updated by hand. Armed with new data, the analysts would have to manually reformat all their charts and graphs and the report would be reissued.

Even if the charts and graphs being used in the updated report were the same format as the previous year, with the only change being the data that is about to be visually represented, each chart or graph would have to be rebuilt from scratch.

According to our own modelling, a typical business information firm could spend around 1,300 hours manually reformatting just its charts and tables – that’s equivalent to 0.8 full time analysts doing nothing but drawing up new charts every time an update is issued.

This single, updating process was long, arduous, and as a result would happen infrequently; and if mistakes were also discovered the process of re-authoring, approvals, and republishing would become even longer, more inefficient and, frankly, a good deal more tedious.

Thankfully, all of that can now be a thing of the past. Publishing technology has evolved to the point where updates can be automated and edits made to live documents in seconds, liberating the analyst from drudgery and an inefficient use of their valuable time.

New technology, changing costs

In fact, now that the capability exists to publish and update on a continual basis – rather than annually, or every 18-months – market forces will quite quickly encourage all research and analysis firms to move to a system of automated updating – doing otherwise will just prove to be uneconomic.

Our modelling suggests that manual reformatting on an annual basis costs around $120,000. When you move to quarterly, the cost grows to $480,000 – that’s before you’ve even considered the cost of the research itself.

A research business that continues to manually update while rivals automate updates and publish continually is likely, over quite a short time, to see its rival become more efficient.

So, what are the benefits of automated reformatting and updates?

  • Research refreshed more often – maximising the value of its data and insights
  • Customers return regularly to check new content
  • Enables use of a service model, rather than single-sales
  • Encourages greater economies and efficiencies for the research publisher

Reconfiguring the analyst

Of course, there’s a final bullet point missing from the list above. The most significant benefit to any research business is that automated updates can liberate its analysts’ time. Rather than changing text, updating tables, and redrawing charts and graphs, technology allows them to concentrate on maximising the quality and depth of their research

Automated updates and continual production may at first seem like technical efficiencies, but what they really do is give research businesses back their analysts’ time and expertise.

3 simple search features that encourage subscribers to buy more content

Building a subscription service around your Market Intelligence content is a great way for a research business to ensure a recurring income – but once it’s established how do you encourage further sales?

Building a subscription service around your Market Intelligence content is a great way for a research business to ensure a recurring income – but once it’s established how do you encourage further sales?

Away from the fluctuations and stress of having to bring in revenue each month, teams can be freed to think creatively around how they can enrich their customers’ experiences and add value with new products and additional content bundles. If, however, your subscribers already have access to a wealth of content, how do you encourage them to buy more?

Let’s assume that the subscribers in question only have partial access to your portfolio. In this article, we’re going to look at three simple ways research businesses can encourage greater cross and upsell from a subscriber base by adding basic features to their search returns.

‘Others also viewed’

What’s the best way to let subscribers know about useful content that lies beyond their licence? How about showing them what other people are interested in the same reports or search terms have accessed? This could include those reports to which they don’t have access yet.

If, time and again, a key bit of content seems to be beyond their access rights, they might suddenly find an interest in extending their subscription.

Offer content outside their subscription

Similarly, if a subscriber to ‘Supermarket Food’ content, for example, enters the search term ‘blueberries’ in your database, what about showing – in the returns alongside content to which they have access – relevant content that lies outside their subscription?

If you can provide a button that lets your subscriber instantly buy a report on sales of blueberries and blueberry-containing products – or even add a whole new category to their existing package – then you have just cross-sold to them without breaking a sweat.

Offer granular search results

It’s good to offer fresh content outside of what a user already has access to, but beyond showing them a report title, how do you convince them that these additional reports will be of significant relevance to their work?

In the search results, what about clearly displaying how often their search term appears in a chapter or section within a report that they currently do not have access to? This would let the prospective buyer know how relevant a piece of content is to their research and understand what they are missing.

Now you understand these three simple features, why not give them a try and see if it helps your customers find and buy more content?

Tags

  • Content Management
  • Personalisation
  • Search